Framing Photographs, Fast and Furious

Assembling frames in the woodshop. Framing can be hot, dirty work, definitely a labor of love. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Assembling frames in the woodshop. Framing can be hot, dirty work, definitely a labor of love. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

It’s official: I’m having an opening at the Henry Hood Gallery in Covington, Louisiana, in 10 days—July 14th from 6 to 9 pm! My photographs of Lake Pontchartrain will be on view along with the glass sculpture of Wes Koon. This feels like a long time coming but maybe not really so much: I’ve been seriously working on my Pontchartrain series for only the past two years or so and it’s truly gratifying to have such a distinguished gallery interested in showing the work. Thanks to Henry and his lovely wife, the talented painter Gail Hood, for giving me this opportunity!

Assembled 16 x 20 poplar frames. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Assembled 16 x 20 poplar frames. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

But that’s in 10 days—right now I’m killing myself trying to get everything assembled and ready for the show. Unlike most photographers, I’m also doing all of my own framing, for several interelated reasons.

The first reason is purely personal: when getting out of school eons ago, I knew I was interested in photography, writing and woodworking, in no particular order. I’ve made my living as a photographer, but I’ve also kept up my passion for writing and furniture making. So building the frames is something I actually enjoy doing.

Frames hung up to dry after pickling finish has been applied. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Frames hung up to dry after pickling finish has been applied. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

But it’s also deeply satisfying on another level: I love the notion of taking something all the way from the initial concept (the image), through editing, toning and to the eventual concrete display (the framed archival print). It’s the perfect combination of art and craft, rolled up into one finished product.

A box of prints, archival matt board and a scratch sheet for calculating image placement. This is a precise and exacting business. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

A box of prints, archival matt board and a scratch sheet for calculating image placement. This is a precise and exacting business. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Finally, framing myself changes the economics.I really want people to be able to afford the work and that means providing something that’s not only beautiful but also a good value. Quality framing is expensive, but by doing it myself I’m able to keep the pricing down.

Matted prints waiting to be signed and numbered. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Matted prints waiting to be signed and numbered. (Copyright 2012 / Andrew Boyd)

Right now I feel like I’m running a marathon. The printing is done and the frames are all built and finished. I’m in the middle of matting everything now. By this weekend I’ll be doing final assembly.

Wish me luck!

Hi, I’m Andrew Boyd, a.k.a. The Discerning Photographer, and I hope this post has been interesting and informative. Please leave me a comment about it, let me know what you’d like to see more of on the site! You can also sign up for email delivery of all future articles or my RSS feed. Or subscribe to our Facebook page or our Twitter feed. Thanks!–DiscerningPhotog

Posted in: Landscape

About the Author:

Photographer, videographer and photo editor. Host and creator of The Discerning Photographer web site. Currently a Canon shooter.

4 Comments on "Framing Photographs, Fast and Furious"

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  1. Greg says:

    Oh no! I’m missing this by only a few days! We’ll be arriving in town on the 18th, and we are staying in Covington, too. The stars just didn’t quite line up straight enough.

    However, I would like some suggestions for places to go shoot in the area. My wife and 12 year old son will be with me, so I’m not likely to get to spend hours on my own. So if you know of some good family and photography friendly places to go, I’d like to hear about them.

  2. BayouBill says:

    Greg, not to worry. Henry’s gallery is open every Thursday – Saturday from noon till 5:00 PM, so you can still see Andrew’s work when you are in Covington (if everything hasn’t been sold, that is ). Check the gallery’s Facebook link in Andrew’s post for details, including the phone number.

    Places to shoot: In Covington, Bogue Falaya Park at the foot of New Hampshire Street, anywhere along the lakefront in Mandeville, Fontainebleau State Park, also in Mandeville on Hwy 190, and, if you can find a canoe, Cane Bayou, just past Fontainebleau Park on Hwy 190. Also, anywhere walking or bicycling along the Tammany Trace that runs from Covington to Slidell, including the trail itself for natural beauty, and the Covington and Mandeville trail heads for quirky architecture. You can Google any of these places for details on location and access.

    (The Mandeville lakefront and Fontainebleau State Park have been the locale of a number of Andrew’s images that he’s posted here.)

    Hope this helps. Have fun!

    Bayou Bill

  3. Greg,
    Bill’s suggestions are excellent for the northshore of Lake Pontchartrain; if you’re going to be in New Orleans, I highly recommend the Visitor’s Guide app that we developed at The Times-Picayune for iPad. (I did the photo selection for it.)
    Here’s the link:
    http://itunes.apple.com/app/new-orleans-the-ultimate-insiders/id495271905?mt=8

  4. Thanks for all the suggestions! We’ve been having a good time down in New Orleans so far, despite the rainy weather. Unfortunately the rain has kept me from getting out in the evening to any of the local parks near Covington to get any pictures. I’m hoping tonight is better since it will be our last night here. I’m planning to go by Henry Hood’s sometime this afternoon to view Andrew’s photos, too.

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