Maine coast photowalk

MAINE COAST PHOTOWALKING

Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

Low tide. 41mm, 1/3200th sec @ f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

We’re off the coast of Maine for our big summer photo trip this year.

It’s an amazing place called Deer Isle, an actual island a couple of hours

north of Portland and home to the largest working lobster fleet in the state.

Tree in fog. 42mm, 1/125th sec @ f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

Seaweed on dark Atlantic sand beach. 35mm, 1/100th sec @ f8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

The miracle of Airbnb brought us to a magical cabin tucked into 4 acres

of woods on this island, about a mile from the coastal town of Stonington.

This area isn’t all scrubbed clean and pretty for us tourists, although it’s pretty enough

all the same. But driving state Highway 15 to the coast is a mix of

pretty New England architecture and hard scrabble fisherman housing,

lobster traps stacked in yards and old weathered lobster buoys littered about.

It’s great to see we’re in an area that’s still hard at work.

Runabout dinghies at a floating dock, Stonington Harbor. 24mm, 1/1000th sec @f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

This morning a big fog rolled in and I headed out to photograph. As anyone

that has followed my work knows, there’s nothing I like better than a dense foggy

morning. This was one of those.

I started along the working harbor where the docks were almost empty, the

big lobster boats all out working, save for one. (A local had explained

to me yesterday that the lobsters had only recently ‘arrived’ off the coast

and the fishermen were all hard at it.) The little boats scatttered about

are the small dinghies the loberstermen use to mark their ‘moorings,’ their

anchorage locations that they rent from the town.

They bring their big boats in, unload their catch at one of the commercial docks,

then either head back out or anchor at their mooring spot, using the small boat to zip to shore.

28mm, 1/4000th sec @ f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

From there I headed down the coastal road a bit to a beach access we had spotted

the day before. It was a beautiful cove just west of Stonington.

Here the fog was especially thick and with the tide out, huge granite

boulders revealed. Ragged pines and spruce rise up out of crags in these rocks, somehow

eeking out an existence here.

AMAZING SEAWEED

Wet seaweed on shore. 53mm, 1/50th sec @ f9 ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

But the seaweed! Lucious in hues of yellows and browns,

the seaweed drew me like a moth to the flame. I photographed several specimens

from a variety of angles. One huge, flat piece–at least 12 incles wide and six feet long–

lay stranded on a boulder, waiting for the return of the water in about 6 hours.

Giant seaweed on granite, low tide. 35mm, 1/125th sec @f8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

Sailboats in Stonington Harbor. 125mm, 1/2500th sec @ f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

Sea gull in flight, Stonington Harbor. 200mm, 1/2500th sec @ f2.8, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

I was reminded of the work of one of my favorite landscape photographers,

Michael Kenna. His foggy pine images from Asia have always been favorites

of mine.

Blue dinghy, Stonington Harbor. 70mm, 1/80th sec. @f10, ISO 200. Photowalk early on a foggy morning in Stonington, Maine.

I will never tire of this work. The quiet. The simplified, flattened and softened fog landscape.

The chance to work through the problem solving that all visual artistry involves–this

is what I live for as a photographer.

Posted in: Gallery, Landscape

About the Author:

Photographer, videographer and photo editor. Host and creator of The Discerning Photographer web site. Currently a Canon shooter.

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