A Photographer’s New Year’s Resolutions

Photo ideas for 2010. Do you ever commit yourself to a shoot list? (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

Photo ideas for 2010. Do you ever commit yourself to a shoot list? (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

Do you usually make New Year’s resolutions? If so, have you ever considered making resolutions for your photography? Things you want to accomplish as a photographer in the coming year?

I’m thinking this might be an excellent way to begin the ‘Photographic New Year’.  So here are five resolutions I’m making for 2010:

1. Create a list of things/subjects/ideas/themes to pursue photographically.

Write the list down. Brainstorm. Prioritize the list. Then map out a schedule to begin working on turning the list into reality. I have a few ideas in mind already, but I’m going to sit down and really do some work on this one.

2. Make more prints.

Printing photographs, as opposed to simply taking them, is a commitment to that particular image. (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

Printing photographs, as opposed to simply taking them, is a commitment to that particular image. (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

Some people believe that until you make a print, you haven’t really made a photograph.

I love to shoot, the act of making photographs. But I’m not very diligent about turning enough of those images into prints. This year I want to assemble groups of prints around some specific themes, still to be determined.

3. Develop a better image backup routine.

I've never been sufficiently disciplined about image backup. This is a definite goal in 2010. (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

I've never been sufficiently disciplined about image backup. This is a definite goal in 2010. (Copyright 2009 / Andrew Boyd)

This has been my Achilles heel. Last year I had a computer crash that resulting in the loss of many images never saved anywhere else. It still hurts to think about this, such a preventable thing! I need a better, more systematic approach to image backup. Suggestions, anyone?

4. Schedule more ‘photo safaris.’

Photo safaris. Trips just to shoot. (Photo by Unplug / Flickr)

Photo safaris. Trips just to shoot. (Photo by Unplug / Flickr)

Trips. Out in areas I know less well, broadening my photographic horizons. Days spent this way can be incredibly energizing and rewarding.

5. Improve The Discerning Photographer!

Creating and publishing this photo blog during 2009 is easily the most important photographic project I started in 2009. My goals for the site in 2010 are simple. I plan to work hard to improve the site, to make it a more valuable resource for all photo enthusiasts, whether amateur or pro. I want to improve the quality of each and every post. And I want to work to become a more effective member of the photography blogosphere! (All constructive comments, ideas and thoughts on this would be most welcome.)

Do you have a list of photographic resolutions for the 2010? Spend some time thinking about what your goals may be, for yourself and your photography, in this new year. Write them down, then put the list in a safe place. Check back often to see how you’re doing. Hold yourself accountable!

selfport1aHi, I’m Andrew Boyd, a.k.a. The Discerning Photographer, and I hope this post has been interesting and informative. Please leave me a comment about it, let me know what you’d like to see more of on the site! You can also sign up for email delivery of all future articles or my RSS feed. Thanks!–DiscerningPhotog

Other Year-End Stories of Interest:

YourPhotoTips’ favorite photo books of 2009

EpicEdits: Brian Auer’s favorite personal images from 2009

Strobist’s favorite posts from 2009

RomePhotoBlog’s 2009’s Best Images

A Photo Editor’s Predictions for 2010


Posted in: Inspire

About the Author:

Photographer, videographer and photo editor. Host and creator of The Discerning Photographer web site. Currently a Canon shooter.

2 Comments on "A Photographer’s New Year’s Resolutions"

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  1. David Joachim says:

    Andrew,
    For Christmas I got a coffeetable book of Herman Leonard’s jazz photos. It included a print of one of his many Katrina-damaged photos. I wondered how many of his unpublished celebrity mementos were destroyed by the storm, then resolved to print some of my favorite digital shots. We tend to use the computer as storage for treasured old photos, but often fail to reverse the process for electronic photography. Without a good backup system, digital photos are merely etch-a-sketch images waiting to be shaken into oblivion.
    David Joachim

  2. Andrew says:

    You are so, so right, David. You’ve said it better than I did in the post. I think too about images I have stored on computer discs that are no longer easy to access–remember 100MB Zip drives? Until we make prints, we are always at risk of losing our images simply out of technological change.
    Andrew

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