Photographer’s Notebook: North Carolina, Day 2

Rock and water #1, Big Creek, North Carolina. (Copyright 2011 / Andrew Boyd)

Rock and water #1, Big Creek, North Carolina. (Copyright 2011 / Andrew Boyd)

I drove yesterday to a favorite spot that I hadn’t seen in almost a decade: the Big Creek campground on the northern end of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Big Creek is a small tents-only facility that is on the Appalachian Trail, right at the point that the Trail enters the park.  The creek is part of the Pigeon River watershed and runs through the area with a lot of power. At Big Creek, it’s a rushing stream moving past smooth boulders, large and small.

The magic of rushing water is a fascination when you don’t live around it year round. For me, this became a day of seeing things up close and as abstractions, the aperture and shutter speed of my camera informing my understanding as I tried various things, looking for what worked. I’m surprised to realize now, looking at the shoot in an image browser, that there’s not one photograph of the overall stream: everything is happening down in front of me, close at hand.

Here are a couple of photographs from the shoot.

Rock and water #2, Big Creek, North Carolina. (Copyright 2011 / Andrew Boyd)

Rock and water #2, Big Creek, North Carolina. (Copyright 2011 / Andrew Boyd)

Hi, I’m Andrew Boyd, a.k.a. The Discerning Photographer, and I hope this post has been interesting and informative. Please leave me a comment about it, let me know what you’d like to see more of on the site! You can also sign up for email delivery of all future articles or my RSS feed. Thanks!–DiscerningPhotog

Posted in: Gallery

About the Author:

Photographer, videographer and photo editor. Host and creator of The Discerning Photographer web site. Currently a Canon shooter.

2 Comments on "Photographer’s Notebook: North Carolina, Day 2"

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  1. Albin says:

    Thanks for this – I do live near some running water (ravines in Toronto) and like to go into them to shoot, but never thought to go in so close.

  2. Thanks Albin. We all have our unique way of looking at things and mine is frequently up pretty close.

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