The Care and Feeding of a Photo Blog (or Garden)

Flowering onion. Canon 50mm macro, 1/4000th sec @f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2919 / Andrew Boyd)

Flowering onion. Canon 50mm macro, 1/4000th sec @f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2919 / Andrew Boyd)

My wife and I grow a vegetable garden here most months of the year and right now we’re in the late Spring/early Summer planting mode. There’s lots to do, lots to plan and design, lots of work that needs to happen now if we want to reap the benefits later on in the summer….sort of like this photo blog!

I was struck by some of the similarities as I pulled weeds and shot some photographs in our terraced back garden space last week. This is a new area—only two years old—that gets lots of sunlight since Katrina took away so many of our trees.

Climbing squash plant. Canon 50mm macro, 1/2000th sec @f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Climbing squash plant. Canon 50mm macro, 1/2000th sec @f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Like a garden, a blog needs a bit of attention every day to run smoothly.

Bloggers all know this. Like weeds growing up amongst your plants, bad things happen when you don’t keep a close eye on your blog. Spam comments, plugins that quit working, things that need your attention. Ignore this for very long and you’re going to have a mess to clean up, just like in the garden!

Onion stalks with early-morning dew. 1/640th sec @ f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Onion stalks with early-morning dew. 1/640th sec @ f2.5, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Like a garden, a blog is all about lots of small, incremental steps that together, can lead to big rewards down the road.

We start seeds in a cold frame in late February, hoping for plants to put in the ground in May. I add a new feature in the side rail of the blog, hoping to generate new reader interest and response.

Like a garden, there’s lots of trial and error with the blog: What’s the best way to reach a wider audience? What sorts of stories are my readers most interested in ? Am I presenting everything in the most accessible way? How could I improve it?

Dead plant stalks. Something not coming back from the roots. 1/40th sec @ f6.3, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Dead plant stalks. Something not coming back from the roots. 1/40th sec @ f6.3, ISO 200. (Copyright 2010 / Andrew Boyd)

Like the garden, the blog is a living thing. It has a life of its own in a way, a community of readers and enthusiasts that all care about photography, and becoming better photographers.

In the garden, we plant, water, weed, and pray. But we’re not really in control, only hoping we’ve set up conditions that will bring results down the road. In the same way on the blog, I’ll start a new feature, try a new social media service, add a new plugin, all looking and hoping for more readership and reader involvement down the road.


Hi, I’m Andrew Boyd, a.k.a. The Discerning Photographer, and I hope this post has been interesting and informative. Please leave me a comment about it, let me know what you’d like to see more of on the site! You can also sign up for email delivery of all future articles or my RSS feed. Thanks!–DiscerningPhotog

Related content on the web:

Tips for Starting a New Photography Blog at  Epic Edits

Utilizing Flickr as a Photoblogging Tool at YourPhotoTips

PetaPixel Turns One Year Old at PetaPixel


Posted in: Web

About the Author:

Photographer, videographer and photo editor. Host and creator of The Discerning Photographer web site. Currently a Canon shooter.

2 Comments on "The Care and Feeding of a Photo Blog (or Garden)"

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  1. Tom Knoflook says:

    Sounds like Being There 🙂

  2. Rebecca says:

    Very inspiring photos, Dead plant stalks is my favorite – the colors are fantastic. Thanks for sharing the settings for the camera, I will try them out.

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